learning

Google Glass Email

Why I Applied for and Actually Paid for Google Glass

Posted by | Mobile, Personal, Professional Development, Wearable Tech | No Comments

$1,500 is a lot of money to pay for a device that can get you attacked in public, so why would I willingly subject myself to being labelled a “glasshole” by applying to the Glass Explorers Program?

While research suggests that using the latest high-tech devices can make people appear more authoritative and boost career prospects, I’m targeting this cutting-edge technology for my own personal interest and development.

“If only I started developing apps when the iPhone first came out,” I’ve found myself thinking countless times, lamenting my slowness to explore mobile phone development. Well, wearable technology is the new iPhone.

Having the chance to be at the forefront of this technology gives me the opportunity to learn about development for wearable technology long before the public starts buying the devices, giving me time to explore a nascent technology and user market before it goes mainstream. Yes it technically was sold publicly for less than a day, but in reality it’s never been widely accessible to the public.

The prospect of being able to develop apps for a technology on the verge of becoming the leading ubiquitous personal computer is simply too exciting to pass up.

So you’ll have to forgive me if you’re among those who believe technology is ruining The City or society in general, but to me this technology has so many positive applications from medical technology to social media that it’s almost silly for me not to at least kick the tires early on.

For the enraged bar patrons, I’m sure a little etiquette and respect for privacy will help me avoid offending others in public.

Fun note: the “Purchase Glass” button in the email they sent me didn’t work in FireFox, forcing me to use Google Chrome instead to open the email and click through to the purchasing page. Well played, Google.

Code Academy Logo

Codecademy: Back to Basics

Posted by | Professional Development, Resources, Web Design, Web Development | No Comments

Technology is always updating at seemingly breakneck speeds. Lately I felt like I needed a refresher on the basics so I started playing around with Codecademy and I’m really enjoying it! You can even track progress and share with friends, like my profile here. Since most of my knowledge was self-taught and through experience, I this is a great way to remind myself to avoid bad habits.

Running through basic courses on Codecademy really helped remind me of some of the fundamental concepts behind HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP and jQuery, and has helped introduce me to Ruby and Python. It seems everything these days is all about data, so learning at least a little Ruby and Python should help me better understand some of the products I manage. PHP is great, and I’m already quite familiar with it, but it’s far less exciting of a language than Ruby and Python. Just the same, Codecademy has been a great chance to refresh the basics and explore new programming languages. Some of their courses have some interesting bugs, but they have a good Q&A section that provides answers to problems based on what people have already run into.

Want to get in touch? Let's Connect
Top